Barn Owl
Blackbird
Blackcap
Black-headed Gull
Black Redstart
Blue Tit
Brambling
Bullfinch
Buzzard
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Chiffchaff
Coal Tit
Collared Dove
Common Gull
Coot
Crested Tit
Crossbill
Cuckoo
Dunnock
Feral Pigeon
Fieldfare
Garden Warbler
Goldcrest
Goldfinch
Goshawk
Great Black-backed Gull
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great Tit
Greenfinch
Green Woodpecker
Grey Heron
Grey Partridge
Grey Wagtail
Hawfinch
Herring Gull
Hoopoe
House Martin
House Sparrow
Jackdaw
Jay
Kestrel
Kingfisher
Lapwing
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker
Lesser Whitethroat
Linnet
Little Owl
Long-eared Owl
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Mallard
Marsh Tit
Meadow Pipit
Mistle Thrush
Moorhen
Nightingale
Nuthatch
Peregrine
Pheasant
Pied Flycatcher
Pied Wagtail
Quail
Raven
Red Kite
Red-legged Partridge
Redpoll
Redstart
Redwing
Reed Bunting
Ring-necked Parakeet
Robin
Rook
Sand Martin
Serin
Short-eared Owl
Siskin
Skylark
Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Spotted Flycatcher
Starling
Stock Dove
Stonechat
Swallow
Swift
Tawny Owl
Treecreeper
Tree Sparrow
Turtle Dove
Waxwing
Whinchat
Whitethroat
Willow Tit
Willow Warbler
Wood Pigeon
Wren
Yellow Wagtail
Yellowhammer

British Garden Birds Logo Home page. Bird identification guide. Site map. Discussion board. Articles on birds and birdwatching. Having problems? Search this website. Photograph album. Guestbook for your comments. News about the birds in my garden. Contact us. Test your identification skills. About this website. Field trip reports. Links to other websites. Awards won by this website. British Garden Birds Navigation Map

Cat Deterrents

Cats have always been a problem in our garden - harassing and killing birds, killing fish and fouling the garden - but then in the 1990s, when nearly twenty different cats were intruding we decided something had to be done.

We tried various deterrents that others had recommended, these included:

One suggestion we did not try, for obvious reasons, was having our own cat to defend the garden from other cats.

Ultrasonic Scaring Devices

CatwatchAlthough sceptical about the likely success of the electronic cat scaring devices we purchased a Catwatch MkII from Concept Research.

This small device (shown on the right) emits bursts of ultrasound when the integral movement sensor detects something moving.

The only specific problem we have experienced with the Catwatch MkII, of which we have three units, is that the exterior of the lens has a tendency to mist up with frost or dew and stop working until it clears. Also, this lens becomes brittle with age, but replacements are available from the supplier.

ScatterThe Scatter unit, shown on the left, does not have a movement sensor. Instead it emits ultrasonic bursts of random duration at random intervals. Consequently, this unit's performance seems unaffected by weather conditions.

The Scatter unit was available from Krystal, but the company seems to have either ceased trading as Krystal (or Clearflow) or ceased all together.

Both types of unit work! Most cats are stopped in their tracks before making a rapid departure, while other more welcome wildlife such as foxes, bats, and hedgehogs seemed not to be affected. Today, there are just two or three cats that visit the garden and we presume they are either deaf or daft!

As well as deterring the cats, you can protect the birds by ensuring they have cover such as a tree or bush close to where they are feeding, but not so close as to provide a hiding place for cats and other predators.

There are other similar systems available; Primrose London stock a good selection.


Last revision: 21 Feb 2015
Copyright © David Gains 1999-2017.
Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites