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Nest Boxes

We can encourage many of our garden birds, especially Blue Tits and Great Tits, to raise a family in our gardens by providing nest boxes.

Types of Nest Box

There are 3 popular types of nest boxes used in gardens, each type designed to attract a particular group of birds.

Standard Nest Box
Standard Nest Box

 

 

 

If there are squirrels present then a metal plate fitted around the hole of a standard box will prevent them from enlarging the hole in order to feed on any eggs or young birds that may be inside the nest box. This will also prevent woodpeckers from enlarging the hole but not from making a new hole.

Metal Plate
Metal Plate

Where to Buy

These nest boxes can be purchased from most garden centres, do-it-yourself stores or wild bird food suppliers.

Alternatively, you could make your own nest box and there are several books to help you, such as Birdfeeder Handbook and the BTO Nestboxes Guide. Also, the RSPB has a leaflet entitled "Nest boxes for large birds".

A basic standard box plan is available if you decide to build your own.

The standard boxes, especially those for Blue Tits and Great Tits, are also available ready-made with cameras inside (or you could fit your own camera) so that you can follow progress from nest building through to fledging on a TV or monitor in the comfort of your home.

Blue Tits in my Nest Box Blue Tits in my Nest Box follows the day-to-day nesting activities of a family of adorable Blue Tits in a nest box fitted with a camera. The book is available as an e-book with all proceeds going to British Garden Birds. More details...

Location

A standard nest box for small birds should be fixed to a tree or wall at between 2 to 5 metres (6 to 16 feet) above the ground, out of the reach of cats and people.

The holes should be sheltered from prevailing winds and direct sunlight. If there are no trees providing this shelter or shade, the hole should face north to south-east. The box should tilt forwards slightly to ensure rain runs away from the hole.

If you are fixing the box to a tree, tie it to the tree using wire or leather strapping to avoid damaging the tree. If you must use nails, use aluminium ones or the special fixings that are now available that the reduce damage that would be caused to the tree as it grows.

Maintenance

Some species have more than one brood, so when one brood fledges and leaves the nest, do not straightaway remove the old nest, because the parents may return to have another brood. The simplest approach is not to removing the nest material until 3 or 4 weeks after the brood had fledged, but do remove any dead nestlings.

In the autumn, the nest boxes should be cleaned out by removing nest material, eggs and dead birds. Unhatched eggs may only be removed from September through to January and they must be destroyed - it is illegal to keep them.

Further, the infectious or parasitic organisms that may be present in the box should be killed by washing out with boiling water or veterinary disinfectant.

If you forget to do it in the autumn, late January is the next best time to clean the box out.

Remember: Hygiene is paramount - especially for yourself.


Last revision: 16 Feb 2016
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