Barn Owl
Blackbird
Blackcap
Black-headed Gull
Black Redstart
Blue Tit
Brambling
Bullfinch
Buzzard
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Chiffchaff
Coal Tit
Collared Dove
Common Gull
Coot
Crested Tit
Crossbill
Cuckoo
Dunnock
Feral Pigeon
Fieldfare
Garden Warbler
Goldcrest
Goldfinch
Goshawk
Great Black-backed Gull
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great Tit
Greenfinch
Green Woodpecker
Grey Heron
Grey Partridge
Grey Wagtail
Hawfinch
Herring Gull
Hoopoe
House Martin
House Sparrow
Jackdaw
Jay
Kestrel
Kingfisher
Lapwing
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Lesser Spotted Woodpecker
Lesser Whitethroat
Linnet
Little Owl
Long-eared Owl
Long-tailed Tit
Magpie
Mallard
Marsh Tit
Meadow Pipit
Mistle Thrush
Moorhen
Nightingale
Nuthatch
Peregrine
Pheasant
Pied Flycatcher
Pied Wagtail
Quail
Raven
Red Kite
Red-legged Partridge
Redpoll
Redstart
Redwing
Reed Bunting
Ring-necked Parakeet
Robin
Rook
Sand Martin
Serin
Short-eared Owl
Siskin
Skylark
Song Thrush
Sparrowhawk
Spotted Flycatcher
Starling
Stock Dove
Stonechat
Swallow
Swift
Tawny Owl
Treecreeper
Tree Sparrow
Turtle Dove
Waxwing
Whinchat
Whitethroat
Willow Tit
Willow Warbler
Wood Pigeon
Wren
Yellow Wagtail
Yellowhammer

British Garden Birds Logo Home page. Bird identification guide. Site map. Discussion board. Articles on birds and birdwatching. Having problems? Search this website. Photograph album. Guestbook for your comments. News about the birds in my garden. Contact us. Test your identification skills. About this website. Field trip reports. Links to other websites. Awards won by this website. British Garden Birds Navigation Map

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British Garden Birds is dedicated to helping garden birdwatchers to identify and enjoy the birds that visit their gardens, and to understand the birds' lives and behaviour.

This month... Did you know?
Goldcrests, Treecreepers, Bullfinches and other normally difficult to see birds can be seen more easily among the bare trees. Also keep your eyes open for Redwings, Fieldfares and Waxwings, which have flown from Iceland and Scandinavia, among berry laden trees. Small birds, like Wrens and Long-tailed Tits, need to eat 30 to 40% of their body weight daily to survive the short, cold winter days. In mid-winter, this means they may have less than 8 hours of day light to find enough food to survive the long cold nights. More>>
Vote now! Things to do...
Vote Now! (Opens in new window)There have been a lot of hedgehogs born late in the summer, many of which are now too small to survive the winter and are being taken to wildlife rescue centres. Do you have hedgehogs in your garden and have you rescued any them?  Vote now! Happy AdventHappy Advent! Have a look inside and discover something about your garden birds.

Don't forget to provide food and water for the birds during the festive season.

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Last revision: 30 Nov 2016
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